Hearing aids, hospital use and cognitive decline – research round-up 

Hearing aids, hospital use and cognitive decline - research round-up 
  • 27
    Apr

Hearing aids, hospital use and cognitive decline – research round-up 

A new study suggests that hearing aids might decrease the number of visits older people make to hospital. The study, published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, reports that people with severe hearing loss who use a hearing aid were less likely to visit an emergency room or spend time in hospital. These findings come at a time when lawmakers are arguing for the US to improve access to hearing aids. Read more.

Elsewhere, Hearing Health and Technology Matters reported a new study which suggests that hearing aids might slow cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, analysed data to assess whether hearing aids altered the cognitive trajectories in older adults. The researchers analysed large datasets in the US and found hearing aid use was positively associated with improved memory test results. “Hearing aids may have a mitigating effect on trajectories of cognitive decline in later life”, the authors of the research concluded, adding that providing hearing aids or other rehabilitative services for people with hearing loss might reduce the rate of dementia as the population ages.